Top 10 Best
BROWSE TOP TEN LISTS BY SUBJECT: A | B | C | DE | F | G | H | IJKLM | NOP | QRSTU | VW | X | Y | Z
 

 

RELATED LINKS

 

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: Quotes

Mark Twain Letters

Mark Twain Quotes

Top 10 Best Huckleberry Finn Quotes

Top 10 Best Books

Top 10 Best Great Gatsby Quotes

Top 10 Best Paradise Lost Quotes

Top 10 Best Jane Eyre Quotes

 

SPONSORED LINKS

 
 
 

 
 
Top 10 Best Tom Sawyer Quotes

#10

 

Tom appeared on the sidewalk with a bucket of whitewash and a long-handled brush. He surveyed the fence, and all gladness left him and a deep melancholy settled down upon his spirit. Thirty yards of board fence nine feet high. Life to him seemed hollow, and existence but a burden.

--MARK TWAIN, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Ch. 2

 
#9
 

Often, the less there is to justify a traditional custom, the harder it is to get rid of it.

--MARK TWAIN, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Ch. 5

 
#8
 

Shortly Tom came upon the juvenile pariah of the village, Huckleberry Finn, son of the town drunkard. Huckleberry was cordially hated and dreaded by all the mothers of the town, because he was idle, and lawless, and vulgar and bad -- and because all their children admired him so, and delighted in his forbidden society, and wished they dared to be like him. Tom was like the rest of the respectable boys, in that he envied Huckleberry his gaudy outcast condition, and was under strict orders not to play with him. So he played with him every time he got a chance.

--MARK TWAIN, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Ch. 6

 
#7
 

Spare the rod and spile the child, as the good book says. I'm a-laying up sin and suffering for us both, I know. He's full of the old scratch, but laws-a-me! He's my own dead sister's boy, poor thing, and I ain't got the heart to lash him somehow. Every time I let him off my conscience does hurt me so; and every time I hit him my old heart 'most breaks.

--MARK TWAIN, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Ch. 1

 
#6
 

What a hero Tom was become now! He did not go skipping and prancing, but moved with a dignified swagger, as became a pirate who felt that the public eye was on him. And indeed it was; he tried not to seem to see the looks or hear the remarks as he passed along, but they were food and drink to him.

--MARK TWAIN, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Ch. 19

 
#5
 

The minister gave out his text and droned along monotonously through an argument that was so prosy that many a head by and by began to nod —- and yet it was an argument that dealt in limitless fire and brimstone and thinned the predestined elect down to a company so small as to be hardly worth the saving.

--MARK TWAIN, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Ch. 5

 
#4
 

All trials bring their compensations. As Tom went to school after breakfast, he was the envy of every boy he met because the gap in his upper row of teeth enabled him to expectorate in a new and admirable way. He gathered quite a following of lads interested in the exhibition; and one that had cut his finger and had been a centre of fascination and homage up to this time, now found himself suddenly without an adherent, and shorn of his glory. His heart was heavy, and he said with a disdain which he did not feel, that it wasn't anything to spit like Tom Saywer; but another boy said "Sour grapes!" and he wandered away a dismantled hero.

--MARK TWAIN, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Ch. 6

 
#3
 

In order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to obtain.

--MARK TWAIN, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Ch. 2

 
#2
 

Work consists of whatever a body is obliged to do, and play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do. There are wealthy gentlemen in England who drive four-horse passenger-coaches twenty or thirty miles on a daily line, in the summer, because the privilege costs them considerable money; but if they were offered wages for the service that would turn it into work, then they would resign.

--MARK TWAIN, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Ch. 23

 
#1
 

The elastic heart of youth cannot be compressed into one constrained shape long at a time.

--MARK TWAIN, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Ch. 8

 
BROWSE TOP TEN LISTS BY SUBJECT: A | B | C | DE | F | G | H | IJKLM | NOP | QRSTU | VW | X | Y | Z
Home | Quotes | Poems | Trivia | Short Stories | Tarot | Movie Quotes | Plays | Google | Wikipedia | Links

© 2010 - Top10-Best.com